Posts Tagged ‘look

04
May
12

Free RedCine-X Film Look for Scarlet and Epic

I’ve finally decided on a look for our interior shots, for the feature i’m working on at the moment. A look for on-set preview and a good base for the style and look we’re after in post; inspired by the (in-)famous orange and teal look (Tony Scott and others). I hold back on the exaggerated orange skin look. Blacks are black, but low-midtones and shadows will appear teal. I personally don’t expose to the right (ETR) but expose skin @ around 50%, since we have controlled lighting on the set. If you shoot ETR or on maximum sensor exposure, adjust the Shadow and Mid Gamma Raise controls in RedCine-X, or adjust the FLUT value. The look uses three different curves for R,G and B. Touch the latter and you’re on your own… ūüėČ

The pictures below are not the best demo, but apply it to your own footage, play with it and feel invited to discuss and/or upload your variation on this theme.

I show you¬†before and after pictures, but don’t forget that the source is a 4K raw image that can look like anything “before”. Click on the images for the full 4K picture, although with 80% JPG compression. You can download the RedCine look file below.

Before… 4K@24fps 35mm@f4 Redcolor-3 Redgamma-3

After… Orange and Teal. Exposed skin @50% avg, 60% max peak

You can download this RMD file for free here: http://mediatube.marvelsfilm.com/METERED_ORANGETEAL.RMD

You can use this file to import in RedCine-X Pro (download free from Red.com) or put it on your SSD and import it into your Scarlet-X or Epic camera.
Cheers!

Martin Beek

28
Dec
11

Marvels Picture Styles, Plugins and donations

Marvels film, Jorgen Escher (colorbyjorg.wordpress.com) and i have published a number of free Picture styles (a.k.a. recipies, picture profiles, looks) and a free plugin for Final Cut Pro.

I don’t want to link to the files directly here, but list the URLs where you can download the latest version of each.

All these products are free and free to use (also professionally) and to share, with the sole exception that you may not charge money for it.

If you like the free Marvels profiles and/or plugins, you can make a small donation via PayPal by clicking the button below. This is voluntary and much appreciated ūüėȬ†Donations will be spent annually (usually around Christmas) as a donation to a good cause.¬†On december 23th 2011, the amount of 414 Euros was donated to Save The Children, via eBay MissionFish. Thanks for your donations!
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  • Marvels Cine Picture Style for Canon DSLR cameras v.3.4
    This special picture style for Canon DSLR (video) D-series cameras such as the 1D, 5D, 7D, 50D and others, has become very popular by both DSLR enthousiasts and professionals equally. Several feature films and many short films shot by the Canon 5Dmk2 have been shot using the Marvels Cine picture style.
    Also referred to, in many publications on the web, as:¬†Marvels Advance,¬†Marvels Flat,¬†Marvels Cinestyle,¬†Marvels Cine,¬†Marvels Advanced flat,¬†Marvels Panalog, and other…
    These are all names for one and the same product and it’s official page is here:¬†https://marvelsfilm.wordpress.com/marvels-cine-canon/
  • DSLR Moire Filter for Final Cut Pro v.1.01
    This FCP plugin battles the disturbing problem of micro-moire. Micro-moire manifests itself as red/blue color streaks and pixels that appear in natural and irregular patterns, such as hair, water and grass. Micro-moire is seldom visible on the camera’s LCD display and sometimes not even on a 7? external monitor. Many a good shot has been spoiled. Get them back off the shelf and run them through this new filter!
    Cameras that are prone to deliver this artifact are the Canon D series DSLR cameras, such as the 5D, 7D, 50D and others.
    The official page is here: http://colorbyjorg.wordpress.com/plugins/
  • Sony EX-1 flat picture profile for cinematic look¬†
    Before we had HDSLR cameras, i had to use either 16/35mm film cameras or HD videocameras with a “Depth of Field” adapters. I’m glad to say that this all belongs to the past now, but i still have fond memories of my first Sony HD camera, which was the EX-1 and later the EX-3. We used both the RedrockMico and Shoot35 DOF convertors and Nikon & Zeiss lenses. To program the camera in such a way that the imagery was matching 35mm film, we developed this picture profile.
    The official article is here: https://marvelsfilm.wordpress.com/2010/04/24/all-new-sony-ex1-picture-profile-for-cinematic-look/
  • Red Epic & Red Scarlet looks files: coming soon…
08
Aug
11

Panny af100 / af101 flat picture style for cinematic look

Update, august 11: detail settings altered – see note below

In addition to my previous article, here is our latest picture style recipe (“Scene file”) for the AF101.

We are currently in preproduction phase for our upcoming feature production “I miei geni”, a Dutch/Italian coproduction. We’ve rounded off a few days of test-shoots with our cameras, including the AF101 and we have settled for one definitive scene file.

Marvels Film cine-style profile for AF100/101:

  • Operation type:
    • FILM CAM
  • Rec. Format:
    • 1080/24P
  • Synchro Scan:
    • 180.0d
  • Detail level:
    • -6
  • Vertical detail level:
    • -6
  • Detail coring:
    • -4
  • Chroma level:
    • -4
  • Chroma phase:
    • -2
  • Master ped:
    • -2
  • Gamma:
    • Cine-Like-D
  • Matrix:
    • Norm2
Remarks:
  1. We have corrected the chroma phase to reduce a magenta hue we experienced using the Norm2 matrix.
  2. Updated august 11: Detail is dialed down to -6 instead of -7. The¬†threshold¬†of actually seeing electronic sharpening artifacts in the picture when zoomed in at 200% lies around the -5. I would personally not go higher as -4 at all times. ¬†Panasonic has confirmed that -7 equals “detail off” on the AF101. Keep it at -6 or -7 for cine-style production.¬†
  3. Updated august 11:¬†Coring does smooth-out noise in the image, but also all high frequency detail. The coring mechanism is not able to distinguish between noise and fine detail, such as strands of hair or fine patterns on leaves. If you deliberately want a smooth-skin-plastic-video-image though, dial this setting up… For your peace of mind: the coring setting is less effective when detail is dialed down to -4 as we do. After talking to Panasonic, we have adjusted coring in our picture style to -4, to have it “eat up noise” in the blacks and low IRE regions only. Panasonic techies advise to keep coring two points above the detail value.
  4. If you are concerned about noise in the image: don’t be! This profile is very low noise, but – and this might sound strange – not too low-noise thanks to the low coring setting. Too little noise in the image enhances the visibility of so-called “banding”, “solarization” or “posterization” in gradients. This (and all sub $10k cameras on the market today) are 8 bit cameras (4:2:2 color, having only 256 chroma levels). Masking banding artifacts in digital images (from both digital cameras and digitally scanned 35mm film) is done by adding noise! This might sound strange indeed, but this is common practice with all the prominent editing and grading¬†facilities in the industry, for years already. So making the image even cleaner in-camera or during post can emphasize the 8-bit banding artifacts. The gradient is “broken up” (and less smooth) by the introduction of “obstacles” in the image (like ¬†noise), forcing the imaging mechanism to calculate multiple gradients within one gradient, resulting in a perceptually smoother image.
  5. Update: If you use the Cine-D gamma setting, you should consider lighting the scene following old-school film practice: 55IRE max on faces! You will probably apply a curve to the picture, or adjust contrast and/or gamma in post -> kicking up the middle range up to around 70IRE again. Lighting caucasian skin over 55IRE with Cine D will result in problems if levels are lifted in post.
Cheers to you all, and special thanks to Jorgen Escher (http://colorbyjorg.wordpress.com) for his explanation of the coring and banding technology.
Martin Beek
Twitter: @martinbeek
http://www.martinbeek.net
IMDb: http://imdb.me/martinbeek



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